Handling your wedding photography

Handling your wedding photography

My opinion is that there are many aspects that make great wedding photography as a whole. A wedding is among the days that you should treasure until your very end. As such I am not an advocate of tricks to make things look something that they are not. I aim to make my images as natural as possible, so that in the many years to come they remain timeless.

For the greater part of a wedding day I will simply take pictures of you, your guests, the venue and some of the details and decorations that you have lovingly embellished upon it. There will be times where I will take hold, these are such things as confetti throwing where instructing guests where to go and when to throw result in better pictures. There are times during the day where I find it convenient to take couples away from other guests for limited periods in order to get good pictures of just the two of them. Unlike some photographers I try to keep pictures of the couple restricted as my belief is that you should enjoy your day and the company of friends and family, I therefore aim to keep these parts to a maximum of 20 minutes at a time over perhaps two or three stages.

I send out a group photo list along with a schedule guide, the grouping list helps me to co-ordinate family groups that couples typically want. The schedule guide helps me to plan how best to manage your day, it also gives me all important contact numbers for any emergencies.

After I return from a days wedding photography my first job is to download all image files into an editing program and select the pictures that will be passed over to the client. Once I have made a selection I will then individually adjust and correct for colour and exposure until I achieve what I deem to be a satisfactory picture. I will do a final pass through the selection and will duplicate some images to be turned into Black and White. The final stage will be to process all the adjusted RAW files into two sets of JPEG; a high resolution set ideal for printing, and a lower resolution set for internet sharing and computer viewing. These are then copied onto a USB drive put into a personalised presentation case and sent to the client.